Week 16 – Jessica

So continues my obsession with the old and the new living side by side.  This is Dongdaemun, one of the eight gates that used to be entrances to the city.  It was the gate to the east and hails from 1396.  The gate carries the status of national treasure #1, which leads me to wonder why we don’t number our national treasures in the US.  Dongdaemun was under wraps being restored when we got to Korea.  We went on a bus tour that pointed out this treasure and we looked out the window to see it wrapped in something akin to a house being tented for termites.  It’s nice to see it restored and in all of it’s glory.  The area surrounding the gate is a massive shopping area.  I have a slight thing for fabric and this is where it’s found in mass.

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  • Melissa - Jessica, I find it coincidental that you post this picture of Dongdaemun this week. In my Korean language class we were discussing all of the different markets and their names. Mun in Korean means door, gate, or passway. So I am intrigued to actually see the gate itself that the market is named after. Also, Dong and Nam are direction indicators. Dong is East, Nam is south. I have really enjoyed learning more about the city through its language.ReplyCancel

  • Trish - I LOVE this shot!ReplyCancel

  • Jessica - Isn’t it fun when it all comes together?! I have to say, one of my pet peeves is when people say “Dongdaemun Market.” Market is already in the name, no need to say it again! 😉 People say “Namsan Mountain” too, but since san = mountain …ReplyCancel

  • melissa - That is what happens when people don’t know the language I guess! Looking at your picture and you talking about the new and the old together reminds me of a stretch of road on base near the PX. The main stretch in front of the PX food court, on the left hand side beyond the food court, there is a line of trees next to a concrete wall that is lined with barbed wire. In the fall I kept looking at it considering the beauty of the colorful trees next to the harsh razor wire. I think it would make a great picture, but I am not capable of capturing it, I bet you would be Jessica.ReplyCancel

  • Kelly - I love this picture, Jessica. And I think I’ve been guilty of both the Dongdaemun Market and Namsan Mountain. Whoops!
    I have the feeling that I want to see more of the old in Korea, to me it seems all lost in the new. All the history I know (which is very little) is post WWII. Maybe I need a trip to the grown-up section of the history museum.ReplyCancel

  • Grandma Rita - Not that I am one to talk, Jessica, but really? A slight thing for fabric?ReplyCancel

    • Amber - I thought the same thing. Gross understatement. 😉ReplyCancel

  • Molly - I think you should suggest to Congress that they should number our national treasures in order of importance. It would give them yet another meaningless thing to argue over, which would help them to avoid more important issues. A project like this could be years of arguing. Perfect.ReplyCancel