Year Two, Week Twenty-four – Guest

ZachThomasJuwangsan

I started taking pictures, and posting them on my blog, as a way to interact more positively with Korea. Living just south

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of Seoul for a year and then moving to the steel town of Pohang after that, I often found myself focusing on the negative aspects of Korea. The grayness, the uniformity of apartment bloc after apartment bloc, the lack of trash cans, the ever-present brown cloud hovering over all inhabited areas, and the general feelings of stress and unhappiness that sometimes feel like they permeate everything in South Korea. I wanted to get away from those things physically, but I also wanted to get away from them mentally and emotionally. I wanted something else to think about, and I found it through the lens of my camera. I found green fields of rice nearly glowing in the summer sun, I found jagged mountains capped with snow, I found golden sandy beaches meeting the clear, deep blue water of the East Sea. And I found a way to change my perspective on Korea. I found a way to focus on the beautiful things, and ultimately, I found a way to be happy here. This picture is one of those surprising, beautiful places I’ve come to expect to find deep in the Korean countryside. This cliff is just south of Juwangsan Park. In summer, families camp on the rocky banks of the stream, and in winter ice climbers compete to see who can scale a wall of ice.

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  • Bethany - What a wonderful story about how photography has helped changed your ideas on Korea! I feel that blogging has helped me focus on the positives in this country as well. Congratulations to you and your wife on the upcoming birth of your child!ReplyCancel

  • Amber - Gorgeous! Thanks for joining us! I too love the way photography has helped you fall in love with the country. This blog has done that for me!ReplyCancel